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Abstract painter Emmanuelle Auzias chooses colors and textures that express personal, specific emotions and observations. She hopes that viewers will respond by recalling similar feelings of their own. Through her paintings, Auzias wants to have a conversation.

Born in Marseille, France in 1968, Auzias has spent her life conversing between cultures. Her father was born in Corsica, a rugged, wild island in the Mediterranean Sea, and her mother was born in the cool, lofty Swiss Alps. In 2012, Auzias moved from France to Denver, Colorado with her husband and two children. Adapting to cultural differences and language barriers has enriched her passion for communicating with others through art.

Auzias works with acrylic, charcoal, graphite, pastel, ink, and sometimes oil. She is inspired by the atmosphere of her surroundings, such as the scent of a forest, the colors and aromas of a street-side cafe, the feeling of sand on her bare feet, and the dazzling light of the south of France. Her latest collection of abstract paintings evokes the ancient Mediterranean seaport of Marseille as seen through her childhood memories and expatriate dreams.

Auzias studied art in Marseille with Dutch artist Nathalie Pijls. Initially, she focused on figurative paintings of the human body, inspired by her love of contemporary dance. Auzias developed her abstract painting style as she continued her studies at the Art Student League of Denver with Tracey Russel, Marianne Mitchell, Karen Roehl, Rob Gratiot, and Sandy Ceas. In November 2015, Auzias had a show at La Cour, a French Art Bar on Broadway in Denver, with two other French painters. Her latest work is currently represented by Gallery at Studio J in Denver’s Santa Fe Art District.

ARTIST STATEMENT:
“My latest paintings are abstract postcards from me addressed to you. When you look at them, I would like for you to imagine that you are seeing Marseille with me. In each painting, we are together in a place and in a moment that we cannot share in any way except through art.”